WWF Adopt an Animal

WWF Adopt an Animal

from £3.00 a month

More Info

Registered Charity Number: 1081247

WWF Adopt an Animal

WWF Adopt an Animal

Adopt an animal with WWF from just £3.00 a month and help protect your selected species and their habitat. Choose from 14 animals which are perfect as a Charity Gift as they come with a gift pack and cuddly toy!

The Recipient of the Charity Gift Gets :

  • a beautiful cuddly toy of your animal.
  • a gift pack including a factbook about your adopted species, bookmarks, stickers and a personalisable certificate.
  • Wild World magazine delivered 3 times a year plus regular updates on your chosen animal.
  • Perfect as a Last Minute Gift Even if you order late you can get a certificate to print or email to give on the day!

Delivery Info

By Post :
Standard Post offers FREE delivery to a UK address and the pack is dispatched within 3 days but please allow up to 10 days for delivery. Express Delivery costs £7.50 if you order before 2pm Monday - Thursday.

Last Minute Gift? :
Receive a gift certificate to print or email up to the big day!

About WWF Adoptions

For a small regular monthly fee you can Adopt an Animal with WWF for yourself or a friend which will help to safeguard the future of your selected species and their habitat. Animal adoptions make great charity gifts and are also an excellent way to show your support to the worlds wildlife and help to fund the work WWF does on conservation. You can also support their great work with a WWF Membership or by choosing from one of their selection of charity gifts at the WWF Shop.

WWF Charity Information

WWF are the worlds largest independent environmental organisation. Originating in the UK where they were formed in 1961 they are now active all over the world. As a charity the WWF rely heavily on donations from members and supporters.

WWF Facts

  • a truly global network who are active in over than 100 countries
  • a science-based organisation who tackle issues including the survival of species and habitats, climate change, sustainable business and environmental education
  • over five million supporters worldwide
  • 90 per cent of their income comes from donations from people and the business community

WWF's Mission

WWF are on a mission to stop the degradation of the planet's natural environment. They want to build a future in which we can live in harmony with nature. It's a simple mission statement but difficult to achieve. They aim to use their practical experience and knowledge to find and implement long term solutions. They have set out some clear pointers to help achieve their goal.

  • Conserve the world's biological diversity.
  • Campaign for the use of renewable and sustainable resources.
  • Reduce pollution and wasteful consumption.

Latest from the Adopt an Animal Charity Blog

Landmark Deal Struck With Seychelles To Create Protected Ocean Area The Size Of UK

Sea Turtle

The government of Seychelles is doing its bit for conservation and has created a protected area which is the size of the UK in the Indian Ocean. The government created the zone in exchange for having some of its national debt paid off. As a result, the island nation agreed that it will ensure that 210,000 square kilometres of ocean will be protected. The Ocean reserve will prevent tourism and fishing activities in the Seychelles so that no further damage to aquatic life caused by humans occurs.

The Right Whale Is On The Brink Of Extinction Experts Warn

Rescuers Manage To Free Entangled Humpback Whale Calf

This year the birthing season for the critically endangered right whale which takes place during winter ended without a single new born calf. This has not occurred for more than thirty years and experts are warning that the incredibly rare species with roams the South East coast of the United States during the winter is a step closer to extinction. Barb Zoodsman who overseas the conservation effort for the species says it is a pivotal moment and if conservation is not taken more seriously it may mark the beginning of the end of the right whale.