WWF Tiger Protector
The Tiger Protector Book

Tiger Protector

WWF Adopt an Animal

from £5.00 a month

  • Your WWF Tiger Protection Gift pack includes a personalised “The Tiger Protector” book featuring an adult and child of your choosing.
  • Your gift will help WWF’s attempt to double the number of Tigers in the wild by 2022.
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Last Minute Gift

Last Minute Gift?

Left it til the last minute again? No problem! WWF offer a gift certificate to print or email so you have something to give on the big day. Your gift pack will then be received within 10 days of purchase.

FREE Delivery

FREE Standard Delivery

Your gift pack will be delivered within the UK FREE of charge. Your package will be sent out within 3 business days, but please allow up to 10 days for delivery.

Express Delivery

Express Delivery

Express Delivery costs £3.79 if you order before 2pm Monday - Thursday. Your gift pack will then be delivered within 2 - 3 working days.

WWF Registered Charity Number: 1081247

Become a Tiger Protector

WWF Tiger Protector Book

Give a Personalised “The Tiger Protector” Book

WWF have launched a children’s book with a twist – you choose the child to star in it! What’s more every purchase of “The Tiger Protector” will help fund WWF’s vital work in protecting this amazing species.

The book tells the tale of a child who finds a wounded tiger on their doorstep. As the story unfolds the child is taken on a wild adventure which is a great way to have fun, whilst learning about important conservation issues.

Written by Jeanne Willis, this fantastic personalised book makes each copy unique. A beautiful way to show someone you care.

WWF Tiger Protector Certificate

WWF Tiger Protector Gift Pack

Not only will you receive a fantastic personalised book, but you will also get:

  • a tiger protector certificate to show everyone you care.
  • regular tiger news throughout the year to keep you updated
 on everything tiger related.
  • a tiger fact pack so you can show off your knowledge.
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Tiger Facts

5 Tiger Facts

  1. The tiger is the largest wild cat on the planet and measures up to 3.3 metres and can weigh as much as 360 kilograms.
  2. The tiger is not a social animal and prefers to hunt alone and usually at night.
  3. Unlike the other big cats, tigers enjoy spending time in the water and are actually good swimmers, often cooling off in pools or streams.
  4. At the beginning of the 20th century there were 100,000 wild tigers, now there are less than 3000 tigers left in the wild.
  5. Tigers are incredibly fast and can reach speeds of up to 40 mph

5 Reasons to Protect Tigers

The wild tiger is a precious commodity today this is because their critically low population numbers continue to decline as a result of poaching, habitat loss and other human related issues. Whilst tigers did used to roam throughout Southeast Asia, India has the largest number of wild tigers left on the planet. Here are five reasons why you should adopt a tiger.

1. We Are in Danger of Losing the Wild Tiger Altogether

There used to be as many as 100,000 wild tigers at the beginning of the 20th century. Now the wild tiger population has fallen to as few as 3,200. Your adoption will help WWF raise conservation awareness and protect tigers from coming into conflict with humans which is the main threat to this magnificent species.

2. Help WWF Restore the Tiger’s Natural Habitat

Less than 10 per cent of the tiger’s original habitat remains in a country like India. The figure is less in other countries where the tiger roams. The money raised from your adoption will restore the tiger’s habitat which has become fragmented and in the process that will enable them to move more freely within their protected areas.

3. Help Stop Poaching

By far the most significant threat to the wild tiger comes from illegal poaching. Help WWF in its efforts to increase strengthen anti-poaching patrols and increase the availability of prey in the areas they live in. If we can stop the poaching, then the wild tiger population can be saved from extinction.

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4. Help Stop the Trade in Tiger Parts

As we said earlier the biggest threat to the wild tiger population comes from illegal poaching. People hunt tigers for their body parts which are valued in eastern medicine. You can help WWF educate the public by making them aware that there is no medicinal value that comes from a tiger. If we can stop the demand we can stop the supply.

5. Animal Adoption is a Great Gift

Do you know someone that loves animals? If so, adopting a tiger will make a great idea for a Christmas or birthday gift. For just £3 a month you can adopt a tiger and receive a cuddly toy, gift pack and other goodies.

Become a Tiger Protector

WWF

About WWF Adoptions

For a small regular monthly fee you can Adopt an Animal with WWF for yourself or a friend which will help to safeguard the future of your selected species and their habitat. Animal adoptions make great charity gifts and are also an excellent way to show your support to the worlds wildlife and help to fund the work WWF does on conservation. You can also support their great work with a WWF Membership or by choosing from one of their selection of charity gifts at the WWF Shop.

WWF Charity Information

WWF are the worlds largest independent environmental organisation. Originating in the UK where they were formed in 1961 they are now active all over the world. As a charity the WWF rely heavily on donations from members and supporters.

WWF Facts

  • a truly global network who are active in over than 100 countries
  • a science-based organisation who tackle issues including the survival of species and habitats, climate change, sustainable business and environmental education
  • over five million supporters worldwide
  • 90 per cent of their income comes from donations from people and the business community

WWF’s Mission

WWF are on a mission to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment. They want to build a future in which we can live in harmony with nature. It’s a simple mission statement but difficult to achieve. They aim to use their practical experience and knowledge to find and implement longterm solutions. They have set out some clear pointers to help achieve their goal.

  • Conserve the world’s biological diversity.
  • Campaign for the use of renewable and sustainable resources.
  • Reduce pollution and wasteful consumption.

Latest News

More Tigers Owned As Pets In The United States Than In The Wild

Conservation agency Smithsonian estimates that there may be thousands more captive tigers in the United States alone than anywhere in the wild. Estimates of the US captive tiger population range from between 5,000 to 7,000. In contrast, the population of wild tigers is just 3,900 says WWF. Just how things got so bad is difficult to explain and arriving at an estimate of the pet tiger population in the United States is difficult because so many owners hide them.

Tiger Mauls Zookeeper At Cruel Zoo

A cruel zookeeper who allegedly used to boil the bones of big cats has been killed by a tiger. The unnamed 50-year-old man was cleaning the tiger’s enclosure when he was attacked last month. The man had been left alone inside the enclosure at the Xiongsen Bear and Tiger Mountain Village in the Chinese city of Guilin. The zoo claims to have over 1,100 captive tigers and 600 Asian black bears and at one point in time was the largest breeding facility in China.

Amur Tiger Terrorising Siberian Village

Russian forest officials are searching the frozen countryside in a frantic bid to locate a Siberian tiger that is hunting local dogs in remote Siberian village. The Amur tiger is an endangered species and the tiger that is killing the dogs was actually bred in captivity and then released into the wild as part of a conservation program that has been personally endorsed by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

How Wild Dogs Tigers And Leopards Coexist In India’s Jungles

Whilst domesticated cats and dogs may fight tooth and nail, India’s big cats and wild dogs seem to get along with each other just fine. Tigers, leopards, dholes (the Asian wild dog) living in India’s Western Ghat region all compete with each other for exactly the same resources. However, according to a new study which used camera traps to monitor what is happening, all three species seem to coexist with very little conflict between them.