News

We bring you the latest from around the World in wildlife and conservation news.

Lions And Porcupines 

In 1965 a man-eating lion that was featured in Outdoor Life after attacking a Kenyan hunter became famous. That lion was not alone. Many other lions desperate from a deepening drought attacked people in Southern Kenya that year. But this particular lion named Darajani had something curious about him. When he was finally killed, it was discovered that he had a porcupine quill sticking out of his nose.  

Snow Leopards Now Face The Threat Of Infection 

The latest research has found zoonotic pathogens in wild snow leopard blood which is very concerning to people working towards the conservation of the rare big cat. The study was conducted by an international team of researchers who captured 20 snow leopards and found all but one in healthy condition. The study was conducted between 2008 and 2015 by scientists from the Snow Leopard Trust, Snow Leopard Conservation Foundation and other organisations. 

Snake-Necked Turtles To Make A Return To Indonesia 

Singapore will be sending several snake-necked turtles to Indonesia. The species of turtle is actually endemic to Rote Island in East Nusa Tenggara. Singapore is repatriating the species through a re-introduction program run by the Wildlife Conservation Society Indonesia Program (WCS-IP) and Wildlife Reserve Singapore. The turtles will be shipped to Indonesia over the next few months and have been bred by a variety of conservation organisations. 

Healthy Polar Bear Population In Chukchi Sea 

A decade long study of Chukchi Polar Bears that took place between 2008 and 2018 found more bears than was anticipated. Even more surprising the bears were healthy despite all the sea loss in the Bering and Chukchi seas. The result does not mean that bears are not changing their behaviour. A spokesperson for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service which was part of the group that conducted the study says that there are no signs yet that the Chukchi bears are experiencing any negative physiological or physical effects. 

African Penguins Provide Clues For Flying Seabirds 

A new study that taped cameras to the back of penguins has shown that flying seabirds know that they should follow their sea-bound cousins to feast on the fish that penguins locate in the ocean. African penguins, which are the only species of penguin native to that continent and reside on the coasts of southern Africa feed mainly on small fish such as anchovies and sardines.  

Orangutan Rescued After Being Shot 74 Times With Air Rifle 

Back in May an orangutan named Hope was found blinded having been show by an air gun more than 70 times on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. According to the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP), Hope was severely injured and was found along with her month-old infant who subsequently died of its injuries. After being rescued, Hope underwent immediate emergency surgery having been found in a near death condition in Subulussam.   

Mongolian Activist Single Handedly Protects Snow Leopards From Mining Companies 

A former language instructor who is now an animal activist has single handedly managed to save thousands of snow leopards from the threats posed by mining companies. Ms Bayarjargal Agvaantseren who is now 49 first became interested in helping conserve these vulnerable big cuts after she spent some time translating for a group of wildlife scientists during the 1980’s.   

Global Warming Not Likely To Help Mountain Gorillas 

Global warming could end up causing stress to mountain gorillas that live in Virunga and result in increased risk of health problems and cause early death the results of a new study suggest. Researchers collected fecal samples from the wild and found gorillas in Virunga National Park had elevated stress levels during months where there were higher… View Article